Plights of Singaporeans who does not see a future


South China Morning Post (SCMP) reported yesterday (18 Nov) that based on a recent survey conducted by the Institute of Policy Studies (IPS) at NUS, majority of Singaporeans are feeling “stuck in their social classes”.

The findings, released last month (29 Oct) in a paper titled ‘Faultlines in Singapore: Public Opinion on their Realities, Management and Consequences’, covered some 4,015 people aged 18 and above. The survey was conducted between August 2018 and January this year by IPS.

The survey asked respondents if they felt their financial status would improve in a decade’s time, more than five in 10 said they would experience negligible financial mobility while fewer than one in 10 felt their fortunes would decline.

This pessimism cut across all education levels. Only 44% of those with a degree were hopeful of upward mobility in 10 years’ time, with the figure falling to 40.6% for Singaporeans with vocational training or a polytechnic diploma. For those with a secondary school education or below, only 23.8% expected to do better in future, with 10.6% thinking they would be worse off.

SCMP conducted its own survey and found that 4 out of 5 Singaporeans interviewed said their pessimism boiled down to salaries not matching up to costs, and a sense that wages were stagnant.

A Singaporean by the name of “Ho” was interviewed by SCMP. Ho did not complete secondary school, uses an e-scooter for his work and takes home between S$2,000 and S$3,000 a month, depending on the number of deliveries he makes. With the recent ban of PMD on footpaths, he may have to get a motorbike licence and buy a bike to continue at his job. This stretches his already thin finances after supporting a wife and a five-year-old and getting a new three-room flat next year.

“I really don’t know what will happen 10 years later. You ask me to look at just the next two years, and I also don’t know how to survive,” said Ho. “It’s a very rich country but it’s progressing way too fast, not everyone can catch up with the progression.”

As for degree holders such as Beatrice, 24, who writes for a magazine, they too feel the pinch.

Beatrice takes home less than S$3,000 a month and is paying off a student loan of S$28,700 after her four-year bachelor of arts in literature course. She tries to be optimistic about her future, but the cost of living is high and her pay seems stagnant. “I feel stifled,” she said. She lives with her parents in their four-room flat “out of necessity”.

Read more at http://www.theonlinecitizen.com/2019/11/19/4-in-5-singaporeans-say-salaries-not-matching-up-to-costs-and-complain-about-wage-stagnation

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Author: Gilbert Tan TS

IT expert with more than 20 years experience in Multiple OS, Security, Data & Internet , Interests include AI and Big Data, Internet and multimedia. An experienced Real Estate agent, Insurance agent, and a Futures trader. I am capable of finding any answers in the world you want as long as there are reports available online for me to do my own research to bring you closest to all the unsolved mysteries in this world, because I can find all the paths to the Truth, and what the Future holds. All I need is to observe, test and probe to research on anything I want, what you need to do will take months to achieve, all I need is a few hours.​

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