Increased security to deny access to cyberattack

“Ubuntu 11.10 Desktop(32bit) installation CD has been compromised where the folder contains ram0-15 and tty0-62 where they sent screenshots to a maximum of 62 terminals with total control of your keyboard and mouse although it does not contain a key logger which will give it away. Windows desktops seem to be hit with an unknown virus which is even higher than flame virus capabilities and I am still trying to track it down. It seems the creators are targeting me and my research, accessing even my contact lists in my mobile.  The flame virus needs to hop from pc to pc, so it will leave a trail behind even if it deletes all traces from the attack pc, so with network monitoring tools, I can capture and isolate it. The problem I found is attack from suspicious websites which uses code to activate your browser plug-in, sending all activities to a specific website. – Contributed by Oogle.”

IMRWorldwide.com is suspected of possibly being a scam or site engaged in fraudulent activity. Although this has not been verified, below are some community projects watching fraud that may have further information about IMRWorldwide.com.

– Contributed by Oogle.”

Posted: 08 June 2012 1350 hrs
TALLINN: Quick advances in cyber war technologies could soon lead to a new generation of so-called “intelligent cyber weapons” which top global IT defence experts warn could be virtually unstoppable.
“Rapid developments in cyber (technology) might lead to intelligent cyber weapons that are hard to control and it’s practically impossible to use formal methods of verifying the safety of intelligent cyber weapons by their users,” Enn Tyugu, IT expert at Tallinn’s NATO Cyber Defence Centre said at its fourth annual conference on Thursday.
He also warned that programmes developed to counter attacks by malwares like Stuxnet can act independently and could possibly themselves spark conflicts.
“They are quite autonomous, and can operate independently in an unfriendly environment and might at some point become very difficult to control… that can lead to cyber conflict initiated by these agents themselves,” Tyugu said.
“Stuxnet and Flame have shown the side of cyber of which the average user does not think of but which will bring a lot of challenges to all experts who deal with critical infrastructure protection issues – IT experts, lawyers, policy makers,” Ilmar Tamm, Head of the NATO Cyber Defence Centre told AFP on Thursday.
“The number of cyber conflicts keeps rising and it is important to understand who the actors in these events are, how to classify these events and participants, and how to interpret all that,” Tamm said, noting Western leaders have been slow to become aware of even existing cyber threats.
Experts at the conference noted that both China and Russia have significantly upgraded their cyber-defence capabilities in recent years by creating new IT units.
“But the most powerful weapon today in cyber space is still the propaganda, the chance to use the Internet to spread your message,” Kenneth Geers, US cyber defence expert told some 400 top IT gurus attending the meeting Thursday.
Keir Giles, head of Oxford University’s Conflict Studies Research Centre, noted that some Russian leaders seemed to “sincerely believe that the recent opposition rallies after the presidential elections in Russia were initiated by the US in cyberspace.”

– AFP/al
———————————————————————————–
You can protect against the risks of cyberattack by securing these access;
1) No mobile access for places where security is vital, even using jaming devices to create a field where no mobile devices can be used.
2) Secure powerlines using encryption where even the power supply to computers is restricted and also internet access by encryption of all access. Do not use wireless.
3) A gateway monitoring software eg the latest firewall technologies
4) Point-to-point encryption software
If you cover all of the above, there is virtually zero chance of a cyberattack, if someone is trying to access thru the internet to your pc, then just cutoff your internet access temporary by employing monitoring software.
The greatest security breech is that using powerlines via your computer power supply, someone can access your computer even if you do not have internet access. It is using an unknown technology via an unknown protocol. That is the reason you can run but you cannot hide, only this way you can erase every evidence of breech, if you attack by the internet, you will leave your trail, because you need to hop from pc to pc, even if you erase everything on your compromised pc. The easiest attack is to overheat your computer, cause a blue screen, and insert malicious code into your computer. Therefore there will be a great demand for an IT firm to produce encryption software to tunnel your communications from point to point.

Homeplugs (Only the link between Homeplug devices is encrypted) Manufacturers should redesign the Homeplug to even protect the power supply to the PC

Since signals may travel outside the user’s residence or business and be eavesdropped on, HomePlug includes the ability to set an encryption password. The HomePlug specification requires that all devices are set to a default out-of-box password — although a common one. Users should change this password. On many new powerline adapters that come as a boxed pair, a unique security key has already been established and the user does not need to change the password, unless using these with existing powerline adapters, or adding new adapters. Some manufacturers supply adapters with security key buttons on them, allowing users to easily set unique security keys by plugging each unit in one at a time and pressing the button on the front (see more detailed instructions that come with the units).
To simplify the process of configuring passwords on a HomePlug network, each device has a built-in master password, chosen at random by the manufacturer and hard-wired into the device, which is used only for setting the encryption passwords. A printed label on the device lists its master password.
The data at either end (Ethernet side) of the HomePlug link is not encrypted (unless an
encrypted higher-layer protocol such as TLS or IPsec is being used), only the link between HomePlug devices is encrypted. The HomePlug AV standard uses 128-bit AES, while the older versions use the less secure DES.

Since HomePlug devices typically function as transparent network bridges, computers running any operating system can use them for network access. However, some manufacturers only supply the password-setup software in a Microsoft Windows version; in other words, enabling encryption requires a computer running Windows [1]. Once the encryption password has been configured, Windows will no longer be needed, so in the case of a network where all computers run other systems a borrowed laptop could be used for initial setup purposes.
MPPE (Microsoft Point-to-Point Encryption) Shouldn’t it be free bundled with your Windows 8?
Microsoft Point-to-Point Encryption (MPPE) is a protocol for encrypting data across Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP) and virtual private network (VPN) links. It uses the RSA RC4 encryption algorithm. MPPE supports 40-bit, 56-bit and 128-bit session keys, which are changed frequently to improve security. The exact frequency that the keys are changed is negotiated, but may be as frequent as every packet.
MPPE alone does not compress or expand data, but the protocol is often used in conjunction with Microsoft Point-to-Point Compression which compresses data across PPP or VPN links.
Negotiation of MPPE happens within the Compression Control Protocol (CCP), a subprotocol of PPP. This can lead to incorrect belief that it is a compression protocol.

– Contributed by Oogle. 
 

Author: Gilbert Tan TS

IT expert with more than 20 years experience in Apple, Andriod and Windows PC. Interests include hardware and software, Internet and multimedia. An experienced Real Estate agent, Insurance agent, and a Futures trader.

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