NFC with modified Digipass Technology to prevent ID Theft, that is the future of Mobile Wallet


RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) is a tagging technology that is gaining widespread attention due to the great number of advantages that it offers compared to the current tagging technologies being used today; like barcodes. Near Field Communication, or more commonly known as NFC, is a subset of RFID that limits the range of communication to within 10 centimeters or 4 inches.
RFID uses radio frequency waves that are either passive, active, or a combination of both. Active RFID tags have a power source that helps extend their range even further while passive devices rely on the energy that it receives from the interrogating device to send its own information. Among the advantages of RFID is the very small size of the tag that made it possible to be used with small products or to be hidden away neatly. Another excellent advantage is that it doesn’t need a direct line of sight for the information to be read. This is very desirable in baggage tracking application where speed is very essential.
RF waves are used to transmit information across very long distances, and RFID is no different. The RF waves can reach very long distances especially when powered. This kind of range is very desirable in certain applications like animal tracking where the animal being tracked might move a couple of kilometers. But this type of range is not desirable in applications like cash cards or passports. Malicious people can receive your information and clone it into another tag and use it for themselves. This is where NFC comes in.

Objects that are tagged with NFC are usually passive because it does not require that much range. Some have even employed shielding to further reduce the chance of other people being able to read the information. The shielding became necessary when it was discovered that even non-powered tags can still be read over 10 meters away with specialized equipment. Currently, some mobile phones are being equipped with NFC so that they can be used as a cash card of sorts since almost all people carry mobile phones anyway.

Summary:
1.NFC is just an extension to RFID technology
2.RFID is capable of accepting and transmitting beyond a few meters while NFC is restricted to within 4 inches
3.RFID has a wide range of uses while NFC is usually used in cases where security is needed
4.Some mobile phones are equipped with NFC

Two-factor authentication (TFA, T-FA or 2FA) is an approach to authentication which requires the presentation of “two or more” of the three authentication “factors” (“something the user knows”, “something the user has”, and “something the user is”).
Two-factor authentication is commonly found in electronic computer authentication, where basic authentication is the process of a requesting entity presenting some evidence of its identity to a second entity. Two-factor authentication seeks to decrease the probability that the requestor is presenting false evidence of its identity. The number of factors is important as it implies a higher probability that the bearer of the identity evidence indeed holds that identity in another realm (i.e.: computer system vs real life). In reality there are more variables to consider when establishing the relative assurance of truthfulness in an identity assertion, than simply how many “factors” are used.

According to proponents, TFA could drastically reduce the incidence of identity theft, and other  fraud, because the victim’s password would no longer be enough to give a thief permanent access to their information.
Three aspects must be considered for each of the 2 (or more) factors in order to fully realise the potential increase in confidence of authentication:

  • The inherent strength of the mechanism, i.e. the entropy of a secret, the resistance of a token to cloning, or the uniqueness and reliability of a biometric.
  • Quality of provision and management. This has many aspects, such as the confidence you can have that a token or password has been securely delivered to the correct user and not an imposter, or that the correct individual has presented himself for enrollment of his biometric, as well as secure storage and transmission of shared secrets, procedures for password reset, disabling a lost token, re-enrollment of a biometric, and prompt withdrawal of credentials when access is no longer required.
  • Proactive fraud detection, e.g. monitoring of failed authentication attempts or unusual patterns of behavior which may indicate that an attack is under way, and suitable follow-up action.

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NFC is derived from RFID technology and will be an intermediately technology, where there is a real threat of Identity theft if your mobile is stolen, the next technology will incorporate a modified version of Digipass Technology, and it will be impossible to steal your identity, not possible to access the encrypted details, neither will it be possible to copy it, with two pass authentication, with gps co-ordinates, it is impossible to use it beyond certain location, everything will be locked in case of fraud, everything is secure even if you lose your phone. – Contributed by Oogle.

    Author: Gilbert Tan TS

    IT expert with more than 20 years experience in Multiple OS, Security, Data & Internet , Interests include AI and Big Data, Internet and multimedia. An experienced Real Estate agent, Insurance agent, and a Futures trader. I am capable of finding any answers in the world you want as long as there are reports available online for me to do my own research to bring you closest to all the unsolved mysteries in this world, because I can find all the paths to the Truth, and what the Future holds. All I need is to observe, test and probe to research on anything I want, what you need to do will take months to achieve, all I need is a few hours.​

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